Adobe Analytics (aka Sitecatalyst)


#1

Hi there,
I’m trying to test an Adobe Analytics implementation and the Project statistics tells me there are 200+ pageviews, But Analytics does not show a single one of them - not even in realtime reports. I have even disabled bot filtering in Adobe Analytics. Normal traffic from my browser shows up immediately.

What went wrong?

regards,
T.


#2

Thomas, as I see you are using Professional projects, we need to set up every new counter manually by adding it to the system.

We haven’t got any clients yet who are using Sitecatalyst and frankly we’ve never heard of it. Is there any reason why you need it?


#3

Well, for starters Adobe Analytics is the world’s leading web analytics and customer analytics solution (according to Gartner and Forrester) and besides I’m an Adobe employee. :grin:
Adobe Analytics was acquired 9 years ago from a company called Omniture, SiteCatalyst was the brand name of the solution when it was “Omniture”. Thousands of customers are using it worldwide, but most of them won’t need a traffic generator, as they typically have billions of pageviews per year or month.
However, I’m building a Proof of Concept and need some traffic data.
Makes sense?
Thomas


#4

as you say you “need to set up every new counter manually by adding it to the system”, is there anything I can or need to do?
T.


#6

We need to know why it is needed, we haven’t got any clients asking for it and as I see you work for Adobe so we are quite confused.


#7

Hi,
as I already explained, I’m a consultant, working for Adobe. Adobe Analytics is the web analytics tool that is used by most large enterprises in the world. Only Google Analytics ist used by more websites, and that is because you can use Google for free if you are happy with the fact that Google owns the behavioral data of your site visitors (and you don’t).
For a customer workshop I’m building a non-production environment we can use to explain features in our tool; that’s why I’m trying to generate traffic on my little demo site.
I was under the impression that you are using some technology like headless Chrome rather than just sending requests to specific services only. In a real browser the Adobe Javascript would have been executed and a servercall (HTTP/S request) would have been sent to Adobe Analytics (very much like it works for Google Analytics and almost every other Analytics tool in the world). Actually, we make more than one servercall per page view, because we use multiple Adobe tools on that page.
If this is not possible, please let me know. In that case I cannot use trafficbot and need to find some other solution for traffic generation.

kind regards,
Thomas


#8

Thomas, we need a better commitment from a client to implement custom traffic counters, we need at least Ultimate Professional subscription from you to integrate with this counter.


#9

Hi,

I assume you just send HTTP(S) requests to the webserver and don’t do much with the response – specifically, you don’t execute custom Javascript and let that make secondary requests. However, you do send secondary requests to some selected targets (e.g. Google). Is that correct? I wonder if you do execute all the other references on the page that is in the response, especially image requests (). I could put a “tracking pixel” (image request with parameters) on my test pages and see if they arrive in my Analytics datacenter. That would be an acceptable workaround.

Regarding a commitment from my side: If you never get any requests from Adobe Analytics customers, I totally understand that it makes no sense for you to build that target. However, please understand it does not make any sense for me to spend more for a one-time project. I’ll talk to my superiors and try to find out if Adobe is willing to invest, but to be honest I doubt it. Adobe Analytics is a commercial tracking and analytics solution and customers pay for every servercall that is being sent to Adobe. I guess that somewhat limits the use case – there is simply no value for our customers in sending fake traffic to the Adobe datacenter. I guess this is a “let’s just stay friends and have coffee sometime” situation and we can both agree there’s not too much sense in further investments. Unless my management thinks it is.

Kind regards,

Thomas